ADJ 241 - Criminal Law Procedure and Adjudication

Course Description

This course examines the historical background, traditions, and legal principles and foundations of the Criminal Justice System. Both differences and similarities inherent within the Federal and State court processes are analyzed and the procedures through which the Criminal Justice System upholds the rights and liberties of all, both victims and accused will be examined. The roles of all professionals within the Criminal Justice System will be explored. The powers and limitations of power in the Criminal Justice System demanded by the Bill of Rights and the due process clause of the U.S. constitution. An emphasis on Criminal Law will also be examined. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to: Trace the history of the criminal courts from their respective foundations within English-based common law to the contemporary models that currently underlie judicial processes at both state and federal laws. Identify the fundamental philosophies, legal concepts, and terminology that underlie the contemporary American court system. Discuss and explain the import of individual constitutional and statutory rights upon the criminal justice system in the United States. Identify, examine and understand the respective professional roles of those persons who work within the criminal court system as well as those impacted by the court system: victims, defendants, and the general public. Discuss the major issues impacting upon the criminal court systems of today, and project how such issues will likely affect the criminal courts in the future. Understand and explain the procedural processes utilized by the American criminal court system.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3


Course Prerequisites: ENG 100, ADJ 101